Bookish Brains Issue 6

Letter from the Editor:

Spring is upon us, and I hope you’ve been reading some lovely books lately! I had a month full of good reads, and as always I’m happy to share my thoughts with you. In this issue of Bookish Brains, I’ve included book reviews for No One is Talking About This by Patricia Lockwood, Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi, The Confessions of Frannie Langton by Sara Collins, and How the One-Armed Sister Sweeps her House by Cherie Jones. Plus, I give a sneak peek at my May TBR and shout out a few upcoming book releases!

During April, I also received some exciting news: I was accepted into a Master’s program for Library and Information Science! Last week I registered for classes, so this fall I will be attending school again. Through this experience, I’m seeking a career in the library systems, and I couldn’t be more excited. When I was a teenager, I worked for a couple years at a shelver at my local library and loved it. So it’s been a rewarding month and I feel grateful for this opportunity.

Wishing you a beautiful, blooming May! Please leave a comment and let me know what your favorite read from April was; I would love to hear about it.

Cheers!
-B.C.

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Act Your Age, Eve Brown: A Brown Sisters Guide and Book Review

Act Your Age, Eve Brown Book Review

Sometimes, we read to learn, and sometimes, we read to critically reflect. Most often, I tend to read for those two reasons. But there are some books I read which remind me that reading is really fun and Talia Hibbert’s Act Your Age, Eve Brown does that for me.

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Barely Functional Adult: It’ll All Make Sense Eventually… A Book Review

Barely Functional Adult: It'll All Make Sense Eventually Book Review

Are you a barely functional adult? Do you hope it’ll all make sense eventually? Do you want to read, laugh, and relate to a fellow barely functional adult who is likewise holding out hope that it’ll all make sense eventually?

Then Meichi Ng has created a book perfect for you: Barely Functional Adult: It’ll All Make Sense Eventually.

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Bookish Brains Issue 5

Bookish Brains Issue 5

Letter from the Editor:

Another month has passed! I always look forward to writing and posting these Bookish Brains issues because they’re such a rewarding culmination of the month’s reading, as well as exciting to look forward to next month’s TBR and upcoming releases!

For Women’s History Month this March, I resolved to read only books authored by women, which wasn’t too hard for me at all! Four of the books I’ve read this month are featured in this newsletter with mini reviews: Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi, A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry, Motherhood by Sheila Heti, and Silver Sparrow by Tayari Jones, as well as a few comments on my current read Know my Name by Chanel Miller. In addition, I list three of the books on my TBR for April and highlight a few new book releases for April. Lots to look forward to!

Cheers!

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Homegoing: A Book Review

A Book Review of Homegoing

After reading Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi earlier this year, I was extremely interested in reading her previous debut novel, Homegoing, which tells the fictional stories of two half-sisters born in separate villages in eighteenth-century Ghana and their respective descendants.

And as though I weren’t already excited enough to read it, when I opened up to the first few pages and saw a family tree chart, I became even more hyped– who doesn’t love a book with a chart?

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Bookish Brains Issue 4

Letter from the Editor:

Greetings! Even though February is the shortest month of the year, I still managed to read several amazing works. In honor of it being Black History Month, I exclusively read Black-authored books. Not just this month, but year-round as well, I think we should generally aim to uplift the marginalized voices which so often have been ignored throughout history.

In this issue of Bookish Brains, I will be sharing reviews for The Death of Vivek Oji by Akwaeke Emezi, Black Boy Out of Time by Hari Ziyad, the March comic trilogy written by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, and Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde, as well as my currently-reading thoughts on Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin and my reading plans for March! Cheers!

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The Death of Vivek Oji: A Book Review

“They burned down the market on the day Vivek Oji died.”

The Death of Vivek Oji by Akwaeke Emezi begins with this evocative line. Vivek’s death is certain, yet the circumstances surrounding that death are hazy: the body is left upon Vivek’s parents’ house, stripped and battered, leaving mother Kavita with devastated questions and father Chika with a gap in his heart. What happened to Vivek? And moreover, who was Vivek?

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Bookish Brains Issue 3

Letter from the Editor:

Happy 2021! I hope your reading year has begun on a good foot; if not, there are still eleven months to sink your teeth into delicious literature!

The very first book I read this year was Garfield Sits at Home (#7), a comic strip book. I think I find that cynical, chunky feline even funnier as an adult now that I “manage” two cats of my own, who both certainly have distinct attitudes. After that first booklet, I read two more Garfield collections because that was exactly what I needed at the beginning of this month.

Aside from misadventures in Jon’s household, I’ve also read a few other incredible books, which I’m excited to write about! In today’s issue of Bookish Brains, I’m discussing Luster by Raven Leilani, Take a Hint, Dani Brown by Talia Hibbert, In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado, and Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi, as well as my current reads The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune and The Shining by Stephen King.

Moving forward, I plan to publish these issues of Bookish Brains on the last Friday of every month and use the opportunity to summarize the month’s reading. Hope you enjoy!

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2020 Reading Highlights

In 2019, I read fifteen books. The year before that, I may have read five books. But in 2020, I read 74 books, and I think we all know why.

Of those 74 books, I would like to highlight some of the best, worst, and in between, that I think are worth recommending or warning others about. So, behold! The Slanted Spines Reading Awards!

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