Slanted Inktober 2

A few weeks ago, I made a post featuring my Inktober drawings up to Day 11, and gave a brief explanation that Inktober is a month-long drawing challenge where artists draw each day and post it to share with others! (It’s a very informal event, and lots of people interpret it in different ways.) I’ve been posting all of my Inktober drawings to my Slanted Spines social media on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, but I know some of my readers exclusively visit me online or on WordPress, so I didn’t want you to miss out! (Although you should highly consider following Slanted Spines on social media. You won’t regret it!)

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Slanted Inktober

As legend has it, Inktober was created by an artist named Jake Parker in 2009. The sacred scrolls speak of how he desired to challenge himself to develop his artistry and self-discipline, and how over the years, it became a widespread event that many artists participate in as well. Tradition states that each day of October, an artist will draw something in ink and post it with the caption “#inktober,” although many practice this in alternative ways, such as drawing digitally, drawing every other day, drawing calligraphy, and any other way an artist desires to challenge their creativity. Today, this is a custom thousands of creatives partake in, and encourages communities of artists to enjoy their art together.

And this year, I said, What the heck. I’ll try it.

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I Fuel the Great Blog

At the beginning of the summer, when I started writing the first part of what turned out to be an eleven-part series, I didn’t intend for it to be more than a single flash fiction piece. Inspired by Ray Bradbury and the vintage science fiction artwork from the 60’s time period, I had originally sat down to revisit an old story idea I had conceived during middle school. I remember on my parents’ computer, I had named the original Word document “Dum Hum-Drum,” and I recalled it featured an elderly couple sitting at their kitchen table, coping with the boredom of retirement after having filled their lives with productivity and work-work-work. How would they possibly be able to grapple with “free time”? Continue reading “I Fuel the Great Blog”