A Touch of Jen: A Book Analysis

“What the f#*&?” was the phrase I uttered when I finished reading A Touch of Jen by Beth Morgan.

Theoretically, I understood what had happened, but I wasn’t sure I really understood what I had just spent the past few days reading. Scouring YouTube and Google for explanations of the book, I came away unsatisfied, with only an author interview between Kristen Arnett and Beth Morgan to help navigate the contents of this book.

And because I can’t stop thinking about it, I decided to break it down myself.

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Disability Visibility: A Book Report

As I’ve recently discovered, July is Disability Pride Month. At the end of June, I finished a collection of essays entitled Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories From the Twenty-First Century edited by Alice Wong, and having been quite moved by these articles, I would like to highlight some of the voices and encourage you to pick it up as well.

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Variations on the Body Review

Variations on the Body, written by María Ospina and translated by Heather Cleary, is a collection of short stories which primarily take place in Colombia and center on the female body. On July 6, 2021, Variations on the Body releases in the U.S. via Coffee House Press. This past month, I was sent an advanced review copy of this in exchange for an honest review.

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Act Your Age, Eve Brown: A Brown Sisters Guide and Book Review

Act Your Age, Eve Brown Book Review

Sometimes, we read to learn, and sometimes, we read to critically reflect. Most often, I tend to read for those two reasons. But there are some books I read which remind me that reading is really fun and Talia Hibbert’s Act Your Age, Eve Brown does that for me.

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Homegoing: A Book Review

A Book Review of Homegoing

After reading Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi earlier this year, I was extremely interested in reading her previous debut novel, Homegoing, which tells the fictional stories of two half-sisters born in separate villages in eighteenth-century Ghana and their respective descendants.

And as though I weren’t already excited enough to read it, when I opened up to the first few pages and saw a family tree chart, I became even more hyped– who doesn’t love a book with a chart?

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Bookish Brains Issue 4

Letter from the Editor:

Greetings! Even though February is the shortest month of the year, I still managed to read several amazing works. In honor of it being Black History Month, I exclusively read Black-authored books. Not just this month, but year-round as well, I think we should generally aim to uplift the marginalized voices which so often have been ignored throughout history.

In this issue of Bookish Brains, I will be sharing reviews for The Death of Vivek Oji by Akwaeke Emezi, Black Boy Out of Time by Hari Ziyad, the March comic trilogy written by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, and Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde, as well as my currently-reading thoughts on Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin and my reading plans for March! Cheers!

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The Death of Vivek Oji: A Book Review

“They burned down the market on the day Vivek Oji died.”

The Death of Vivek Oji by Akwaeke Emezi begins with this evocative line. Vivek’s death is certain, yet the circumstances surrounding that death are hazy: the body is left upon Vivek’s parents’ house, stripped and battered, leaving mother Kavita with devastated questions and father Chika with a gap in his heart. What happened to Vivek? And moreover, who was Vivek?

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Bookish Brains Issue 3

Letter from the Editor:

Happy 2021! I hope your reading year has begun on a good foot; if not, there are still eleven months to sink your teeth into delicious literature!

The very first book I read this year was Garfield Sits at Home (#7), a comic strip book. I think I find that cynical, chunky feline even funnier as an adult now that I “manage” two cats of my own, who both certainly have distinct attitudes. After that first booklet, I read two more Garfield collections because that was exactly what I needed at the beginning of this month.

Aside from misadventures in Jon’s household, I’ve also read a few other incredible books, which I’m excited to write about! In today’s issue of Bookish Brains, I’m discussing Luster by Raven Leilani, Take a Hint, Dani Brown by Talia Hibbert, In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado, and Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi, as well as my current reads The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune and The Shining by Stephen King.

Moving forward, I plan to publish these issues of Bookish Brains on the last Friday of every month and use the opportunity to summarize the month’s reading. Hope you enjoy!

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