Barely Functional Adult: It’ll All Make Sense Eventually… A Book Review

Barely Functional Adult: It'll All Make Sense Eventually Book Review

Are you a barely functional adult? Do you hope it’ll all make sense eventually? Do you want to read, laugh, and relate to a fellow barely functional adult who is likewise holding out hope that it’ll all make sense eventually?

Then Meichi Ng has created a book perfect for you: Barely Functional Adult: It’ll All Make Sense Eventually.

Continue reading “Barely Functional Adult: It’ll All Make Sense Eventually… A Book Review”

In a Dark Dark Wood: A Book Review

At the beginning of the year, I curated a Slanted Spines reading list for 2020, designating a book for each month. The June pick is In a Dark Dark Wood by Ruth Ware, and this is my book review!

In a Dark Dark Wood is a story about a young woman named Nora who attends a bachelorette party in a cabin in—you guessed it!—a dark, dark wood. However, the bachelorette party is for her ex-best friend Clare, who she hasn’t spoken to in ten years. Unsure why she was invited because she wasn’t invited to the actual wedding, yet curious all the same, Nora accepts the invite. But during the weekend, various bizarre conversations and events occur, and if I say much more, it may ruin the suspense of reading the book! This is Ruth Ware’s debut novel, and she’s gone on to write many other thrillers such as The Turn of the Key and The Death of Mrs. Westaway.

Continue reading “In a Dark Dark Wood: A Book Review”

Carrie Pilby: A Book Review

This book review is intended for readers who have already read Carrie Pilby or for people who haven’t read Carrie Pilby but would rather just read my book review about it! Which is all to say that there are spoilers ahead!

Carrie Pilby, by Caren Lissner, is a novel about a 19-year-old young woman living in New York City. Having skipped three grades and graduated Harvard at age eighteen, she is now a lonely genius living by herself, as afforded by her father who works abroad; although she is financially well-off and intellectually gifted, Carrie has no friends and a slew of self-imposed morally rigid rules. In an attempt to improve her social capabilities, her therapist Dr. Petrov gives Carrie a list of five things to do, including go on a date and celebrate New Year’s Eve. Throughout the novel, Carrie acquires a few strange friends from her part-time legal proofreading job, and another few from local spots. Ultimately, Carrie begins to realize her own hypocrisies as life reveals its complexities, moral ambiguities, and hidden pleasures.

Continue reading “Carrie Pilby: A Book Review”

Recent Reads: Four Brief Book Reviews

Are you searching for the next book to read? Looking to read about something different? This week, I’ve written brief book reviews about my four latest reads! Keep reading to discover something new:

Continue reading “Recent Reads: Four Brief Book Reviews”

An American Marriage: A Book Review

This book review contains plot details and spoilers from An American Marriage by Tayari Jones. It is intended for readers who have already read this book. You have been warned!!

The Slanted Spines 2020 Booklist reading for March was An American Marriage by Tayari Jones, a 2018 selection for Oprah’s Book Club. In this novel, Celestial and Roy are living out their childhood dreams of success. They’ve been married for just a year when a Roy is arrested for a crime he didn’t commit, and due to a faulty justice system, he spends five years in prison despite his innocence. However, during Roy’s absence from free life, Celestial forms a relationship with their mutual friend, Andre. When Roy is finally released, Roy, Celestial, and Andre find themselves in a complicated love triangle. What is love, and to whom do we owe what?

Continue reading “An American Marriage: A Book Review”

Everything I Never Told You: A Book Review

This book review is intended for readers who have already finished Everything I Never Told You! My analysis contains several spoilers.

The Slanted Spines February book was Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng! In this haunting portrait of the Lee family, Ng illustrates a web of complicated relationships and unspoken emotional turmoil between the five members of a Chinese American household in smalltown Ohio during the 1970’s. Everything I Never Told You is a novel that begins with the death of Marilyn and James’ middle (and favorite) child Lydia, and as her mom and older brother Nath swear to discover the root of her senseless death—her body having been discovered in the nearby lake—and as her dad and younger sister Hannah struggle to cope with her absence, a myriad of secrets within her family are unveiled.

Continue reading “Everything I Never Told You: A Book Review”

Where the Crawdads Sing: A Book Review

[A Note from the Reviewer on 10/21/2021:

It has been almost two years since I read this book. At the time, I was incredibly taken by it, and as you’ll read in this review, I spoke highly of its craft and contents. However, in the time since, I have read significantly more books, and I have learned some disturbing information.

Although I will leave my original blog post intact (for now), I would like to comment that I no longer stand by my previous praise. It was an enjoyable read for me at the time, but in hindsight, I now feel that it is a very mediocre book. True, the writing is pretty strong in many cases, but it is not as strong a work of fiction as many other books I’ve read more recently.

Moreover, I have discovered some information regarding Delia Owens and her husband Mark Owens. In a very thorough The New Yorker piece, their complicated actions in Africa allegedly connect them with the hunting and killing of poachers. Though a theoretically just cause, the methods employed are quite ethically questionable and perhaps even racially motivated. All in all, the information makes me feel uncomfortable lauding this book, and while I would typically leave this blog post to collect dust and forget it in the abyss that is the Web, it appears that viewers are still clicking on this post to this day.

Do what you will with this insight.]

Continue reading “Where the Crawdads Sing: A Book Review”

The Slanted Spines 2020 Booklist

Happy New Year, Slanted readers! I have exciting (read: nerdy) plans for this year!

Slanted Spines is starting an informal book club! So, my fellow bookworms, get your notepad and paper out (or open a new tab on Goodreads) and take note! I’ve selected twelve books that Slanted Spines will be reading this year, and on the last Friday of the month I’ll post a book review featuring that month’s book. Hopefully, my Slanted Spines readers will join me in reading these books and discuss their thoughts following each book review!

Continue reading “The Slanted Spines 2020 Booklist”

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a “Care”: A Book Review

This book review is rated “E” for everyone, but the title of the book is rated “PG-13,” or whichever rating using the f-word grants you, because while I have cutely titled this blog post as a book review on a book called The Subtle Art of Not Giving a “Care,” the true title of the book is The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F#@%, which you have Mark Manson to thank (or blame) for that.

Continue reading “The Subtle Art of Not Giving a “Care”: A Book Review”

Imaginary Friend: A Book Review

[This book review will avoid sharing spoilers but cover basic plot points! It is intended for people who haven’t read Imaginary Friend but are considering it. So, if you like going into a book with no idea what it’s about, then just pick up the book and start reading it! But if you’d like to hear my detailed opinion, onward!]

If you’ve read and loved The Perks of Being a Wallflower like I have, then the fact that Imaginary Friend is written by Stephen Chbosky may intrigue you as well. This one caught my eye because as a high schooler, Perks was my favorite book, and although Imaginary Friend promised to be nothing like its young adult masterpiece predecessor, I was excited to crack into it because I love Chbosky’s writing and how he tells a story. (Sidenote: and if you haven’t read The Perks of Being a Wallflower, do that too!)

Continue reading “Imaginary Friend: A Book Review”